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  The 1966 Glorney Cup  
 
Extract from chess volumn 31: August 22nd 1966, page 377
 
The Glorney Cup, Paris 1966
England won the new "bigger and better"
  Sco Eng Wa Ire     Total
England x 4 4 4 3 20½
Scotland 2 x 3 6 18
Holland 2 x 3 4 15
Eales 2 3 x 14½
France ½ 3 2 x 3 12
Ireland 3 0 3 x 10

Turn to page 397 for John Littlewood's racy commentary. He was England's captain!


 

Extract from chess volumn 31: August 22nd 1966, page 397
 
The Glorney Cup Tournament
by J. E. Littlewood
I make no appologies about giving a lengthly report of this junior tournament. The Glorney Cup has now broadened its horizons and has almost become a miniature Clare Benedict tournament, excellent preperation for our youngsters and giving them the opportunity of some international competition. This year it was held in Paris at the centre International de Sejour, a splendid setting for a worthwhile event.

ROUND 1
France Wales
Benoit  1 - 0 Davies 
  Preissmann  0 - 1   Hughes  
Fargette  ½ - ½ Williams 
  Neymann  ½ - ½   Lexton  
Meyer  ½ - ½ Syner
  Montaignac  1 - 0   Evans   
3½ - 2½
           
  England      Ireland  
  Denman  ½ - ½    Moles   
  Sugden  ½ - ½    Henry   
  Tate  ½ - ½   McCaughan   
  Hart  0 - 1    Gibson   
  Botterill  1 - 0    Unwin   
  Holmes  ½ - ½    Cummins   
3 - 3 
           
  Holland      Scotland   
  J. Timman  ½ - ½    Glendinning   
  Boersma  0 - 1    Pritchett   
  Ligterink  0 - 1    Montgomery   
  T. Timman  0 - 1    Taylor   
  de Wilde  1 - 0    Stevenson   
Klaassenn 0 - 1  Jardine
    1½ - 4½       

The first named teams had White on the odd boards.

This was Scotland's day. The contest seemed even in the early stages but suddenly most of the games began to swing to the Scots who impressed me more by their determination and will to win than by their depth of play. Pritchett played well, as did Montgomery in the following game:

Jardine always had the advantage and finished the game powerfully but on two occasions he missed the strongest line.

On board 1 Glendinning was unfortunate not to win but we cannot help but admire the resourcefulness of his 14-year-old opponent, the youngest player in the tournament and Dutch Junior Championship at that. England's result against Ireland was a poor one in view of later events. Denman's game ended in a draw by repetition, both sides reluctant to take risks at this stage. As Moles had just won the Irish championship it was won to show him a little respect.



Sugden very quickly reached a superior position but failed to drive home his advanyage and allow his opponent to escape a draw.

Board 3 gave us a most exciting game with both players striving to make the most of every chance. Tate started with a good attack but sacrificed too many pawns, allowing McCaughan ro begine a counter offensive.

Hart had one of his off days, defending rather too casually against the Rauser attack, refusing the offer of a draw when he stood much worse and finally blundering in a different position.

Botterill's win was a game for the connoisseur. He quietly built up an ompressive position until his opponent cracked as follows.


Roger Holmes tried to break down Cummins' redistance but White always seemed to have enoygh defence.

In the France v Wales match, the French top board player won well from the following position.


Hughes beat Preissmann in delightful fashion as follows, although admittedly aided and abetted by his generous opponent:



ROUND 2
France England
Benoit  ½ - ½ Denman   
  Fargette 0 - 1   Sugden   
Meyer 0 - 1 Tate   
  Neymann 0 - 1   Botterill  
Montaignac 0 - 1 Holmes  
  Preissmann 0 - 1   Wise  
½ - 5½
           
Ireland      Holland
  Moles  1 - 0   J. Timman   
  Henry  0 - 1   Boersma   
  McCaughan  0 - 1   de Wilde
  Gibson  0 - 1   Loderweges  
  Cummins 0 - 1   Ligterink  
Barnwell ½ - ½ Klaassenn
1½ - 4½
           
  Wales     Scotland  
  Davies  1 - 0   Glendinning   
  Hughes 0 - 1   Pritchett   
  Williams  ½ - ½   Montgomery   
  Lexton ½ - ½   Taylor 
  Syner 1 - 0    Jardine  
Miles  ½ - ½ Stevenson
    3½ - 2½      

This round's glory went to England. Our players completely outplayed the French team, except on board 1 where Denman was happy to draw against Benoit. Sugden played the Saemisch variation against the Niemtzo-Indian and his central pawn mass rolled on relentlessly, crushing all resistance before it. Botterill played in similar vein as follows:




Holme's opponent played weakly against the French Defence and interestingly play developed from this position.




Wise played the whole game very powerfully. Here is the play leading up to the decisive combination.



Moles won well on board 1 for Ireland in a difficult tactical game.

Boersma played an attractive if somewhat conventional attack.



Gibson copied Spassky's hippopotamus defence, but Loderweges played much better then Petroshan and Gibson much worse than Spassky!

Wales played will to beat Scotland. All the games were hard fought except for the skirmish, won by Syner, who I am convinced dismayed his opponents by wearing a shirt with BATMAN written across the chest! See for yourself:



Prichett again won convincingly and as a result was promoted to board 1 for the next match. Montgomery, once more defending the Sicilian against the Rauser attack, managed to hold out in the face of strong pressure from Williams. Finally, however, the latter sacrificed unsoundly in the following position.




ROUND 3
England Wales
  Sugden  ½ - ½ Davies   
  Tate  ½ - ½   Hughes  
  Hart ½ - ½ Williams   
  Botterill 1 - 0   Lexton  
  Holmes 1 - 0 Syner  
  Wise ½ - ½   Miles   
4 - 2
           
Holland     France
  J. Timman 1 - 0   Benoit   
  Boersma 0 - 1   Fargette  
  de Wilde ½ - ½   Meyer
  Loderweges 1 - 0   Neymann  
  T. Tinman 1 - 0   Faivre  
Klaassenn ½ - ½ Preissmann
4 - 2
           
  Scotland     Ireland  
Pritchett   1 - 0 Moles  
  Glendinning 1 - 0   McCaughan    
  Stevenson 1 - 0   Henry  
  Montgomery 1 - 0 Gibson
  Shaw 1 - 0    Unwin  
Jardine 1 - 0 Barnwell
    6 - 0      


A quiet day for England. Wise quickly agreed a draw. Sugden had the better of the opening but could not drive home his advantage. and gradually saw it slipping away. Tate equalised fairly easily with an Alekhine's Defence but even though he had some chances,in the rook ending, it never seemed enough to win the game for him.

Hart played the Morra Gambit to try to infuse some life into the game but Williams defended coolly enough.

It was left once more to Botterill to show us how to win, making it all look so simple.


Holmes had been forewarned about BatmanSyner, Winning rook, knight and bishop for his queen, Holmes was still worried because of Syner's passed a pawn.



Ireland collapsed badlt against Scotland, highlighting our bad result in the first round, as Scotland were now leading us by half a point. Pritchett played sound chess against Moles, holding him in a vice-like grip.

McCaughhan, played a Queeen's Gambit, retreated his bishop to b3 and almost immediately regretted it.



Holland's fourteen-year-old top board played a wonderfully mature strategic and tactical game against Benoit:



ROUND 4
England Holland
  Denman 0 - 1 J. Timman  
Sugden 1 - 0 Boersma  
  Botterill 1 - 0 de Wilde  
  Holmes 1 - 0   Loderweges  
  Hart ½ - ½ T. Tinman  
  Wise ½ - ½   Klaassenn  
4 - 2
           
France     Scotland
  Benoit  0 - 1   Glendinning  
  Fargette 1 - 0   Pritchett     
  Meyer 0 - 1   Montgomery
  Montaignac 1 - 0   Stevenson  
Neymann ½ - ½ Taylor
Faivre ½ - ½ Jardine
3 - 3
           
  Wales     Ireland  
Davies  1 - 0 Moles  
  Hughes ½ - ½   Barnwell  
  Williams  1 - 0   Cummins  
  Lexton ½ - ½ Henry
  Syner 0 - 1   McCaugham  
Evans  ½ - ½ Unwin
    3½ - 2½      


Holmes was the first to win in a game which speaks for itself:

De Wilde's opening moves gainst Botterill were strange.

Hart too had a better opening, but still seemed out of form and could not find a winning plan.

Wise played well to draw a difficult game. Most of the excitement of the round came from the top two boards. Denman left too little time in a complicated position and the young Dutch lad once more demonstrated his great tactical ability. Here is the game.


Not a game for Denman to be despondant about, as it was full of interesting ideas.

Sugden's opening gave him easy equality but he risked loosing when he refused the chance of a draw. Fortunatly for him his opponent failed to find the best move in a tricky position and lost as follows:


ROUND 5
Scotland England
  Pritchett  1 - 0 Sugden   
  Glendinning  0 - 1   Botterill  
  Montgomery  1 - 0 Tate   
Taylor  0 - 1 Denman
  Stevenson 0 - 1 Holmes  
  Shaw 0 - 1   Wise  
2 - 4
           
Holland     Wales
  J. Timman  1 - 0   Davies   
  Boersma  ½ - ½   Hughes  
  Loderweges 0 - 1   Williams 
  T. Timman   0 - 1   Lexton  
  Klaassenn ½ - ½   Miles    
  Zigterink 1 -0 Evans  
3 - 3
           
  Ireland     France  
  Barnwell ½ - ½   Fargette  
  Moles  ½ - ½   Benoit  
  McCaughan   0 - 1   Montaignac  
  Henry 0 - 1   Priessmann
Gibson 1 - 0  Faivre
Unwin 1 - 0 Meyer
    3 - 3      

So the tense final round began and chance could not possibly have arranged things better. The two leading teams were to meet, with half a point seperating them. England would win the cup if they drew the match, but 3½-2½ against England would win the cup for Scotland! A similar situation in last year's Glorney Cup had resulted in a win for Scotland... There were going to be no easy draws today! In the event the first game to finish pointed to the final result. Wise, one one of our best young attacking players, won nicely as follows:



Denman, still playing his pet 2. c3 against the Sicilan, was the next to win in convincing fashion with an attack on the king.
It was fitting that the cup was finally won when the team captain Holmes sxploited his opening advantage as follows:



Mean while Botterill had reached an ideal position against the Kings Indian. Try as he would, the Scottish captain Glendinning could not shake off the strangle hold on his game. When he finally blundered away a piece his game was on the point of collapse.
There was now a sense of anti-climax as Pritchett gained a good win over Sugden in a game which was a credit to both players, and Tate lost from the better position. It had been an excellent fight, with the Scotts showing a determination and team-spirit which we all envied.

Lexton won well with an opening line which obviously surprised Black who played badly:



I think it fitting to conclude this report with the remarkably mature game played by the young Tinman against Davies.









 
 
The Glorney comittee are thankful for the kind permission of
 CHESS Magazine chess.co.uk to include the above extracts in their archive material.